Pan Haus

by Penelope
(Fayetteville Arkansas USA)

My great grandfather always made pan haus in the fall during the time they were butchering the hogs. My father would take us kids to the farm when he went to help. I remember very little about it i was 3 or 4 but I do remeber eatting it and watching my great grandmother making it. People have told me it is the same as scrapple but I have had scrapple and it is not the same. Grandfathers was very yellow and I do not remember meat in it but my mother said there was meat in it. Grandfather would serve it to us kids with buttermilk pancakes, eggs, and maple surup. I always thought that they made the pan haus with the water they boiled the meat in to make head cheese, my father loved the head cheese and it seems that was what he had told me before he passed away. I know there was no spices in it other then salt and the flavor was very corn. I hope you can help me I would like to serve my grandchildren the dish I remeber my great grandfather fixed us kids when we were small.
Thank you
Penelope

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Apr 11, 2017
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Mush
by: Cara

Penelope,

I think you are thinking of corn meal mush. Mush is made with corn meal, water, and salt. It is then put into a bread pan to set or some people just fry it up right away. Try this and see if it is what you remember.

Nov 08, 2016
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Panhaus--- spices?
by: Anonymous

My father was from Germany. We made Panhaus every year. Can anyone tell me the spices used? He put in a lot of different ones Both spices and herbs. Plan to make it this weekend and need some ideas.

Nov 05, 2016
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pon haus
by: tom spring

my mother made this, only instead of corn meal she used buck wheat flour. cooked the pork same way, then when cooled ran it through a grinder. always done in the fall, because that was the only time you could buy buckwheat and after 74 years I still make it

Sep 04, 2016
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Ponhaus quick and easy.
by: Lester Swope

EZ Pawn Hoss recipe 1 cup of water. One quarter pound pudding meat.Oneheaping Table spoon of grits or cornmeal. One heaping table spoon of Buck wheat flour.One heaping table spoon of wheat bran or whole wheat flour. Pepper and salt to taste Microwave until very thick.you can eat hot or cool it then slice and fry. Apple butter, syrup, or jelly is always good on fried pon haus.

Jun 20, 2016
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Pan haus
by: Kitty

Your pan haus may ha e been yellow from yellow corn meal. What I grew up with was sort of gray. As I understand bits of meat left from making head cheese or something like that were mixed w corn meal a d water, cooked and poured into flat pagans and chilled. Then sliced and fried

Mar 03, 2016
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Grampa'Margraf...Pon Haus
by: Anonymous

Both my wife and I remember our German heritage ..butchering hogs with the family in 50's...
One of the things was ...Pon Haus...We bought some whole hog sausage from a local fundraiser yesterday. ..also some Pon Haus. ..
It is good. ...memory of our youth.....

Jan 16, 2016
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Breakfast at grandma's
by: Tom from Iowa

My grandmother always made "pontus" (from her Missouri German dialect) fot breakfast. She boiled the hog head, took off the meat and diced it before adding it back to the stock. She then added salt, pepper, red pepper and lots of sage. After cooking the stock for a bit she would add cornmeal and cook until a thick paste. The mixture was poured into long loaf pans (I still have one) and put in the pantry to set. Before frying she would cut slices and then cut the slices into sticks and roll in flour so that all four sides got crispy. Fried in either lard or bacon grease, the "pontus" had a deep, gutsy flavor that went well with fried eggs and dark toast. A wonderful memory!!

Dec 29, 2015
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My Pon Haus Experience
by: Scooter

This is the 'basic' recipe my granny passed to me. In today's world we don't use butchered product, but beef broth and store bought breakfast sausage. My great grandfather, who owned a butcher shop, would make this during the depression. Basically, brown the sausage, drain and add broth. Bring to a boil and add your spices. Using a wood spoon slowly add the cornmeal and stir relentlessly until it just gets too darn thick and you're exhausted. Pour into loaf pons (lol) and let settle. Refridgerate and slice and fry the next day. If you're savvy on cryovac'n, this will freeze well. I love to experiment with the heat by adding chopped jalapenos or the heat of your choice during the boiling process. The hardest of this whole process is stirring while adding the cornmeal. Slice and fry in pan (lol) and crack an egg on top, or syrup, or even mustard. IT'S ALL GOOD! That's my basic ponhaus story. At my daughters request I made 3 loafs last night. I want them to make it for themselves, however. My grandmother's maiden name is Hosfeldt btw. It's really easy to make, but it's not. Experimentation is half the fun here, especially when adding spices. Have fun and there's not a lot of ways to mess this up.

Aug 20, 2015
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At Zack Fleming
by: Tom

Zack- that's exactly how we did with our neighbors when we lived in Inwood, WV.. Everything in the kettle, cook, remove all the cartledge and bone, grind, then back in the kettle to cook down and add cornmeal, flour, salt and pepper.

Did you butcher with Brian and Sandy?

May 26, 2015
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Pan Haus
by: Rita Carder

I started to looking for this pan haus, I really didn't know what it was, we always called it breakfast food, and my mom and grandma always sewed bags and put the recipe in and then twisted the bags and tied them and then boiled them...but I am so thankful for all of your recipes you shared. THANK YOU. It is amazing WHY WE LET THESE OLD RECIPES SLIP AWAY ...

Apr 20, 2015
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Pan Haus
by: Penny

My Great Grandfather always boiled the hog heads strained off the meat to make head cheese then used the broth for the Pan Haus. Grandma made it with cornmeal put it in loaf pans and freeze it. She would slice it thick, fry it, serve it with butter and maple syrup. She also made buttermilk pancakes made with corn milk scraped from the corn cob. They had a working farm. We are full blood Germans.

Apr 16, 2015
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Pan haus is not scrapple
by: Anonymous

A dear gentleman, 101 years old, told me what pan haus is. It's almost everything, including the head of the pig, cooked together until it almost falls off the bone. Anything additional (corn meal or flour) makes it palatable. It's formed into cakes and fried. Maple syrup on top gets it down. He used to eat that during that during the depression.

Feb 19, 2015
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Freezing
by: Anonymous

Sandi, freezes well. I slice and put wax paper between slices then freeze. That way it doesn't mush when trying to slice after thawing.

Jan 16, 2015
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Pon Haus
by: Zack Fleming

When we butchered our hogs in Eastern WV, we would always put the scraps, some of hide trimmings, and many organs in the cast iron pots under an open fire and cook until done. Nothing was wasted. This was then strained out and ground into pudding. The broth was then thickened with lots of corn meal and some flour, seasoned with salt and pepper and we added several "scoops" of the pudding meat, and cooked to reduce to an almost mush, then poured into loaf pans and cooled. Sliced and served fried as a breakfast meat usually with King syrup. The pudding was served on top of corn meal pancakes. Many local farmers still make pon haus to this day and at least 2 butcher shops in the Hagerstown, MD area sell to local stores.

Jan 07, 2015
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my grandmother's ponhaus
by: robert

my grandmother would boil turkey carcass or pork Bones after a big meal and make ponhaus with that. I use breakfast sausage and spice it with garlic, chili powder, salt, pepper, and a small amount of cheyanne. The result is fantastic. We also eat it with eggs in the morning. My grandmother always fried it in oil. The prep is the same as the other ponhaus recipes although I add all purpose flour to reduce cooking time

Dec 02, 2014
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Panhaus
by: Elsie

When I was young we lived in Erie, PA and were part of a large German extended family. The Feasler family was from my gr. Gr. Gr. Grandparents, Carl Feasler/Fussler and Rebecca Ann Throne. Carl came from Germany in 1834 and Rebecca was from a Pennsylvania Dutch family from York PA. The family all loved Panhaus.

It was made at hog butchering time when there would be bits and pieces of pork and organ meat. Some went into sausage, some to head cheese and still there would be more that could not be wasted. Mama would grind them up in the hand grinder, put them in a pot with water and boil with salt and pepper. She would slowly mix in cornmeal until it was very smooth the thick. It was put in loaf pans, cooled. We would eat it sliced for breakfast with maple syrup. I remember going across town on the bus with a pan of Panhaus for my parent's great uncle and aunt at the Feasler homestead. We would stay for supper and my dad would join us there. I associate the term scrapple with more of an early American settler use and it was about the same thing. I think that back in Germany they would not have had cornmeal but used some other grain, possibly oats, finely ground. Someone asked it it could be frozen. Yes, in fact Jones Farms in Wisconsin sells it frozen as Scrapple. It can be made with any ground pork, it does not need to be scraps. But my grandmother used to say, "We use every bit of the pig, but the squeal and if you are quiet at table you can hear that!" I remember trying hard to hear the squeal! LOL! But those folks wasted nothing!

Nov 28, 2014
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German Panhaus
by: Tom

I have lived in Canada for approximately 50 years but come from Nebraska originally and am a German descendant. Our family (I remember eating this as a small child at my Grandmas house back in the U.S)has always made a dish called panhaus. As a matter of fact I just made a batch last night. Ours is made with pork hocks and oatmeal, with allspice, cloves and salt the only spices used. After the loaves are set, it can be sliced, fried in lard and served with syrup. We really enjoy this dish and I can say my kids look forward to having it every Christmas.

Nov 19, 2014
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Our German Pan Haus recipe
by: Anonymous

we too make it every year. The recipe comes from my wife's great-gandparents who came here from Germany.

We make ours by slow cooking a pork butt or shoulder in enough water to cover. When it falls off the bones, let it cool but reserve the cooking water. The grind the pork fat and all and return to pot of water. Bring to boil and add equal amount of flour and cornmeal stirring constantly with a heavy spoon. Keep adding equal amount until all liquid is used and it becomes a thick pasty mass. Pour into glass cake pans and let cool. To cook, slice and fry in butter. It's manna from heaven!!! Eat it with eggs and pancakes or on jelly bread. Can't go wrong.

You can make variations by adding onions or whatever you like but we think this is the best.

Nov 18, 2014
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know the difference
by: Sandi

I know the difference between panhaus and scrapple but one question . . . . . Can you freeze pan haus?

Oct 22, 2014
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corn meal?
by: Anonymous

I always remember my German grandmother and my father making it with buckwheat.

Oct 18, 2014
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Pan Haus
by: Mrs. Ochs

My father in law taught me how to make this. When he makes it in addition to the pigs head he adds the liver to the pot of water. Boil most of the day until the meat has fallen off the bone. He just seasoned with salt and pepper. I throw an onion and some celery in the pot too. Skim the fat and bones. I clean up the meat by hand- there are lots of veins and other "icky" parts. I will run the broth through some cheesecloth so its nice and clean. Take half of the cleaned meat and the liver and grind for liverwurst. Put the rest of the meat back in the pot with the broth over medium heat and start adding cornmeal SLOWLY!! If you dump it all in, it will clump. Cool, pan, slice, fry and enjoy!

Jul 22, 2014
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Child Hood
by: Mike

Im from Central Virgina,and my child hood memory is my mother would take the juice from the cooked turkey on Thanksgiving,and then added cornmeal and put in refrigerator.Next morning fried in a cast iron skillet mmmmmmm heaven.

May 25, 2014
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pon haus
by: Dwight Rollins

There is a butcher shop[ in Hagerstown Md that makes pon haus, scrapple and pork pudding the old way. Pon haus is just the brooth that is left after cooking the meat for pudding and scrapple with just salt and pepper added to corn meal and cooled in pans then sliced and fried.

May 17, 2014
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Pon haus vs Scrapple
by: Scrapple Fan

Pon haus is made with corn meal only, along with some ground meat and broth as described.
Scrapple is made with corn meal and flour, with additional ground meat to that of pon haus.

Apr 20, 2014
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Our Version
by: Tim

When mom & Grand Mom made it they used a cheap cut of pork. They placed it in a presure cooker to get the meat to the proper consistancy & create a good stock. They would refrigerate it over night. Then remove any fat from the top. The meat would be ground & placed bak into the stock. They heated the stock up to a rolling boil. Then added some spices & corn meal. As some said they would try to equalize the amount of stock & corn meal.

Once the concoction reached a certain consistence, like morning oat meal, they would place it into loaf pans. These pans were covered & placed into the refrigerator.

In the morning the panhaus would be sliced & place into a medium hot iron skillet that had a goodly amount of bacon drippings. Once it was browned it would be removed from the pan.

We would cover it with home made jelly or jam. Also served with eggs.

What great memories. It's been decades since I've had any. Mom & grand passed many years ago.

Mar 19, 2014
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Thanks for your Mom's Modern Recipe
by: Snoozie

Hi Bonnie!

Your Mother's Recipe is one that can easily be made in the modern day kitchen on a residential stove with a large deep pot.The cut of meat can be purchased in a regular grocery store instead of the 'hog's head' of the old days (where could I ever hope to find that in my town today?).

I suppose an electric food processor could be used in liu of an old fashioned meat grinder. Did your mom add any spices to the mix before pooring it into the foil lined loaf pans? The tricky part is getting the thirds correct but if the meat is measured after grinding as a starting point then the broth in the pan can be measured with a glass measuring cup and more water could be added or broth could be removed to match the quantity of meat and then the correct amount of oats would be known and could be measured and poored into the pot...when the cook is used to the process the cook could then just 'eyeball' the 'equal thirds'.

I like this recipe because the fat is skimmed off so the boiled pork is pretty lean and it makes good use of heart-healthy 100% Whole Grain Oats! Spray the frying Pan or griddle with "Pam" (or similar) Cooking Spray or Olive Oil and this is a healthy meal with eggs and apple butter (which can also be found commercially at farm stands or homemade 'sugar free').

In some regions Scrapple can be purchased premade and packaged in the cold case of the meat department in a regular grocery store nearby the bacon and other meats. 'Hatfield' is the brand I find but there are many others. I have also found a very old brand from Philly, PA right here in my local grocery store in Connecticut.

In Pennsylvania scrapple is commonly sold in the grocery stores and many brands are available. The Country Store in Pennsdale, PA is also very good. Also, great with PA Dutch (Deutch) fresh smoked sausage.

~Snoozie

Mar 14, 2014
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My mother's recipe
by: Bonnie

As I was eating the last of my recent batch of Pan Haus I decided to Google it and was pleasantly surprised when I found this blog.
It was always a treat when my mother made Pan Haus. After she passed away I vowed to keep the tradition going. Below is her recipe.

Place 1 Large Pork Shoulder in large pot, fill halfway with water, add dash of salt. Bring to boil then reduce heat until done.
Cool overnight in refrigerator.
Skim hardened fat off broth then heat broth and remove pork.
Using a old fashioned hand crank meat grinder, grind pork. This part takes two people. Return pork to pot of broth. Run some quick oats through meat grinder to clean it out. Add that to pot also. Pour quick oats into pot, another big dash of salt and stir. Mother always said you wanted equal parts broth, pork and oats. She also used a wooden spoon and said the consistency was right when spoon would stand up.
Transfer to foil lined loaf pans. Refrigerate overnight or freeze.
Melt pat of butter/marg. in hot skillet. Slice Pan Haus 1/4 inch thick and fry until crispy. Sprinkle with salt and enjoy.


Mar 08, 2014
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pan haus We called it oatmeal sausage
by: Majean

My two German grandmothers made what we called oatmeal sausage, and my cousin from norweigen background called scrapple, now this is a new name to me pan haus or pon haus. We called it oatmeal sausage...used thyme for seasoning, salt and pepper, and quick oatmeal. No corn meal which I can see is the only difference. My touch to this was to use part hot pork sausage, a little zest to it, served with home made bread, juice. What a delightful breakfast, it is a treat for us now, and new to my husband, of English background.

Mar 04, 2014
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Pig Farmer
by: Anonymous

When I was young our family had the community pork supply, we would kill multiple hogs at a time. When they were cut up, the bones were cooked in an iron kettle over a fire in water as the hogs were cut up, more bones were added throughout the day. The small bits of pork raked from them and the bones given to the dogs. The next day, the lard was skimmed from the pot which contained the water - pork mixture. It was reheated, seasoned and yellow corn meal from the farm was added and stirred. When the dad and mom were happy with the flaver and consistancy, the stuff was placed in loaf pans and allowed to cool. Most of the Pan Haus was sold but us kids did get a little of it, fried with maple surp for breakfast. I would love to trast that again!!!

Feb 19, 2014
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I remember it like you do.....
by: Judi

We always made it with cracklins (not those fried pork rinds that you buy). We got the cracklins from the butcher when we took our hogs there. I don't know where you can buy them or how you make the pan haus....would love to find a recipe, though. Takes me back to childhood.....

Jan 30, 2014
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Pon Haus
by: Anonymous

I make Pon Haus probably 3-4 times a year. I grew up in a German household and it was a food we had often for breakfast. I use a pork shoulder roast cooked in the crockpot, shred it, use the broth and cornmeal (and, a small amount of flour). That's the way my Mom made it. The only seasoning I use is sometimes a litte bit of Mrs Dash. I share with a couple of friends (one of Dutch decent). She says they grew up on something similar, but made with beef scraps, not pork.

Jan 12, 2014
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My Granny's Pann-haus
by: Janine

I took a wild guess on the spelling, and was delighted to find your posts. And learning the origins of this peasant dish was just the icing on the cake!

The variation that seems to strike a chord with my memory is the one containing lots of pepper, which to my childhood palate, was hotter than it might seem today.

I feel, after reading all these recipes, that I've restored something I thought I had lost - it was almost like standing next to my southern granny.

What a great site! Glad I found it!

Feb 21, 2013
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Origin of Ponhaus
by: Gene

Just made our my annual 10 gallon batch this weekend teaching the process to younger family members. Very similar to many of the prior recipes. I do however adhere tightly to 5 parts cornmeal and 1 part flour. The origin is interesting. Originally pfan haus (rabbit or hare in a pan) In Germany wild game was the property of the land owner and not available to poorer folks (who immigrated to this country). They made the dish from pork scraps which was common fare. It was so named as a way to feel better about the dish as they would never have the opportunity to enjoy rabbit. Throughout the years the name Pfan Haus was regionally modified and enjoys various spellings and pronunciations through out the US.

Jan 27, 2013
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Mush vs scrapple
by: Anonymous

What you describe sounds like Cornmeal Mush. Made similiar, but with no meat, and taste much more of carn meal. We eat it with molasses. My mom also made scrapple with puddins and corn meal, but we ate that with catsup. Cornmeal mush is a much different and lighter breakfast food.

Dec 24, 2012
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My mom's version
by: Don Reid

My mom was pure German (Gertrude Ross) and her recipe is similar to the ones above... but she added on special ingredient - buck wheat flour. It is hard to find today, so I usually use buck wheat pancake mix. Must be fried in bacon grease to give it the right flavor. (also served with bread and apple butter)

Nov 23, 2012
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Pan haus
by: You can the girl off the farm

The broth was used to make pan haus and the meat was used to make puddins. When I was young I watched my grandparents and father make it. They used a big a big kettle, like a witches caldron, over an open flame in the back yard. They cooked meat off a cleaned hogs head. As described, corn meal was added to the broth and then after cooking, poured into loaf pans. When cool, the pan haus was removed from the pans, wrapped and frozen. The puddins( head meat ) were formed into small bricks and frozen. We ate puddins on pan cakes. It was so rich, it settled I your stomach and just sat there. Great memories.

Nov 21, 2012
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for me, this is more appetizing!
by: Anonymous

I've never looked up Pan Haus recipes online before, I'm amazed. What i grew up with is similar yet quite different. Ours you start by boiling 2lbs breakfast sausage (crumbled) in 3qts water w/black pepper. then take a 5lb bad of yellow cornmeal and slowly add it until it gets really thick. Press it into 2-3 loaf pans and allow it to chill overnight. Slice it and fry it up in some oil and serve with apple butter. Absolutely delicious!

Oct 14, 2012
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Just made it
by: Tom Bieber

I just made 2 batches of scrapple from 2 hogs. We cooked the head, organs and other trimmed bones and boiled them for 2 hours in 7 gals of water until the meat falls off. The meat is removed and the bones are removed from the meat. The broth is strained and put back into the kettle. The meat is run through a meat grinder and added back into the kettle for further cooking. At that point it is called pudding and can be eaten as is. Pudding becomes scrapple when the broth, corn meal and all purpose flour are added in equal portions until the mixture starts to thicken. Cook while constantly stirring until you see the mixture start to slowly bubble. Add salt and pepper to taste. Makes about 15 pans 9x4x2. The more meat the better. Need fat and gelatin to make the scrapple stay together when frying.

Feb 09, 2012
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Aunt Wanda's Pan Haus
by: Mildred Vadney

Aunt Wanda's Pan Haus
What you need and how to do it:
1 hog head cut into pieces, cleaned and washed.
Place head pieces in large pot, cover with water salt lightly and cook until well done. Take meat off the bones, save broth. Grind meat add 1 1/2 tsp. allspice, salt and pepper to taste. Put meat into broth, mix and put back on heat. Stir in 2 lbs. whole wheat flour and 1 to 2 cups white flour cook until very stiff stirring constantly. Aunt Wanda always said a wooden spoon would stand up in pan when you had it thick enough. Then pour mixture into loaf pans to cool. To serve cut into 1/2 inch slices and fry without grease until brown on both sides. Serve with maple syrup for breakfast along side eggs. I cut the blocks in half put it in freezer bags and freeze.

Since hog's heads are difficult to come by I think you could use a pork shoulder and soup meat neck bones and achieve the same end product.

Dec 22, 2011
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response to Pan Haus
by: Ellen

Penelope,
I don't remember meat in ours either, my mother would use the juice off of a fresh sausage that she boiled, add yellow corn meal and seasoning and it would jell and then she would slice it and we ate it the same as you all would, with eggs.
Thank you, Ellen

Aug 16, 2011
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Pon Haus
by: Penelope Million

I just received one today I don't know of it came from you or not though. I would love to know what cook book you had your recipe from. There are some on ebay but i dont want to get the wrong one.
Penny

Aug 15, 2011
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Did u c recipe that i submitted?
by: Snoozie

Hello!
Last Sunday I spent a lot of time typing in a recipe for Cornmeal Pan Haus made with Hog's head and also Buckwheat Pan Haus (Scrapple) and Oatmeal Pan Haus (Scrapple).
Did u ever c it??? I thought that it was accepted correctly when I submitted it. If not let me know because I really think that this is the old-tyme recipe that u have been searching for.

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